• Whitsundays. TQ
    Whitsundays. TQ
  • Fraser Island. TQ
    Fraser Island. TQ
  • Wilsons Prom. Visions of Vic.
    Wilsons Prom. Visions of Vic.
  • Wilsons Prom. Visions of Vic.
    Wilsons Prom. Visions of Vic.
  • Light to Light Walk. Tourism NSW
    Light to Light Walk. Tourism NSW
  • Freycinet NP. Tourism Tas.
    Freycinet NP. Tourism Tas.
  • Tasman NP. Tourism Tas.
    Tasman NP. Tourism Tas.
  • Croajingolong National Park. Visions of Vic.
    Croajingolong National Park. Visions of Vic.
  • Light to Light Walk. Tourism NSW
    Light to Light Walk. Tourism NSW
  • South Coast Track. Tourism Tas.
    South Coast Track. Tourism Tas.
  • Croajingolong National Park. Visions of Vic.
    Croajingolong National Park. Visions of Vic.
  • Coastal walking
    Coastal walking
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The theme for this month's photo comp is "Coastal walking" - and with over 25,000km of coastline around Australia you'll find plenty of great photo opportunities!

Clich here to upload your photo.

 

Want to make the most out of your coastal photos? Here are six handy points

Look for Reflections Any time you’re shooting around bodies of water you should be aware of the potential for enhancing your image with reflections. This is particularly relevant when shooting at sunrise or sunset where your images can be brightened and have interest added to them by reflecting those pretty pinks and oranges in the water before you.

Focus in on details What often grabs your attention most on coastal shoots is the grandeur of the landscape – so it’s easy to overlook what might be at your feet as you’re lining up your shot. The coast is full of smaller opportunities for amazing shots – whether it be sea shells on the waters edge, the footprints of an animal in the sand, small wild flowers growing in the dunes or patterns in rock formations. Take the time to look around you at the detail of  what surrounds you.

Add Foreground Interest When shooting seascape shots its very easy to end up with images that contain few focal points of interest (ie: shots that are half sky and half sand). One way to add interest to these shots is to look for opportunities in the foreground of your shots. If you’re able to place something interesting in the foreground (perhaps some interesting rock pools) you’ll lead the eye into the image.

Slow things Down Another way to add interest and atmosphere to seascape shots is to slow your shutter speed down so that blur any part of the image that is moving. In this way you might get a misty looking sea that captures the movement of waves or a furry carpet of swaying sea grasses. Of course to do this you’ll want to shoot with a tripod to make sure your camera is perfectly still.

Horizons Two last tips when it comes to horizons. Firstly – make sure they’re horizontal with the framing of your image. There’s nothing like a horizon that slopes unnaturally down at one edge of the frame to make those looking at your shot a little sea sick. If you’re going to break this ‘rule’ – break it well and make it an obviously intentional thing. Secondly – the convention is to avoid placing your horizon in the middle of your frame but rather to position it nearer one of the thirdway points (depending upon whether there’s more interest in the sky or foreground of the shot).

The golden hours These are the best times of the day to take photos, which is an hour or so after sunrise and an hour or so before sunset – saying that you can still get excellent photos during the day just consider where the sun is, if it’s cloudy (that’s good as it takes away the sun’s glare) and where the shadows are.

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